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I was looking through my photo album and I found a set of shots taken from a solo ride back in November.  It’s a fantastic ride if you’re ever around the region as it gives you an excellent glimpse of what the Grampians offers.  There were two climbs that I took on for this ride, Mt William and Reeds Lookout.  As the climbing cyclist has already covered Reeds Lookout, I won’t digress too much on it. Here’s a link for the lazy;

The Climbing Cyclist – Reeds Lookout

Mt Wlliam is pretty much the same as Reeds Lookout, except the views improve as you go up higher.  It starts as soon as you turn left from Grampians Rd and continues on for 9.5km.  The average gradient  is between 4-6% and climbs 585m over the distance.

It’s definitely challenging, but far from punishing.  There is a false flat at around the 5.5km mark where the gradient drops to 2%, providing some respite halfway through.  There are two sections were it can end and mostly depends on your level of fitness.  The first is the car park and if you’re up for the challenge (and fun), continue past the boomgates to the summit towers.  It’s another 231 metres of climbing, averaging at 12% for 2km on a narrower bitumen road.

Here are some links –

Strava – Mt William summit – Strava – Mt William carpark cycle2max 

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Below are a few shots I took whilst descending Mt William.  Forgive me for the quality, all shots were taken form my phone.

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Photos of Reeds Lookout –

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If you’re after another climb around the region, I would also recommend going up Boroka Lookout.  Below is a shot of what awaits once you’re up there.  I won’t do a write up on it due to a couple of reasons, I didn’t ride up it and the climbing cyclist has already done the job for me.

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As you may have gathered from my previous post, I’ve been travelling during the last month through Japan and China to put my feet up after three years of non-stop work and study.  One of the best things that I did whilst overseas (and blog worthy) was to go island hopping by bike in Onomichi.

I didn’t get many opportunities to go cycling in this trip, as my wife is generally averse to riding distances over 20km and that I travelled sans bike.

It starts from Onomichi City and ends on Shikoku in Imabari City.  The main route follows the Shimanami Kaido, a 60 km road that connects the six islands.

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The designated route is relatively easy as it follows the island coastlines, but you also have the option to increase the degree of difficulty by going inland and taking on the hills.  There is also the option of taking the ferry if you pussy out halfway through the trip.  Below are few photos of this ride.

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For her to thoroughly enjoy it is a testament to how amazing this part of Japan is.  I truly recommend that you do this on your next visit to Japan.

I first mapped out this ride about 2 or 3 months ago, knowing full well that it would making a ride that would be quite challenging. 110k’s with 2400m elevation can be a decent ride at the best of times, but when 80 or so of those k’s are on dirt, things could get difficult very quickly. Here is a link to what it looks like.

We met at Launching Place at 8am and got quickly on our way. We headed down Gembrook rd until we hit The Pack Track, along the way experiencing what would be the first of many flats along the way.

Gareth helped to set the theme early for the ride.

As soon as you turn onto The Pack Track it turns to gravel. It also begins to climb in altitude, with some parts getting pretty steep but never lasted for a long distance so didn’t pose too much of a problem. We ended up slowly snaking our way through the dense forest, taking in the awesome surroundings and even saw (and heard) a koala not far from the road while we waited to repair another flat. I have never heard a koala in the wild before, and for a second I was actually shitting myself.

We were lied to. This was not the correct way.

After about an hour or so we cleared the treeline and came to a junction in the road. The paths all appeared to be inaccessable or access roads for power companies and we were about to turn around and head back down the way we came until we heard the familiar sound of dirt bikes. Four of them emerged from one of the paths heading up and over the ridge line, so we decided to ask them if they thought the way they had come would be suitable for road bikes. “Yeah, you should be fine, but it’s a bit hilly.” We knew it was intended as a warning, but that was presisely why we were here. We said thanks and headed up the hill, glad we didn’t have to do any backtracking. It was a nice ride along the top of the ridge-line from then on, up until we had to descend. That descent was definately one of the hardest we have done, with the constant 8-9% gradients, loose surface, pot holes, ruts and corrigations keeping us on our toes the whole way down. I had a massive grin the whole time. Be warned though, the bottom brings an intersection with Yarra Junction-Noojee rd, and is a great test of your brakes. (I certainly appreciated my ‘new’ 7410 dual pivot Dura Ace ones!)

The road coming up from the left leads to a sweet ridge with great views. The one leading off up the hill leads to one of the best descents ever.

We now had done about 50k’s, 1500m and had no water left so we turned left at Yarra Junction-Noojee rd and went in search. Three lessons were learnt while on our water mission:

1. Horses are awesome.

2. People in the country like to put non-functioning taps in their front yards.

3. DO NOT jump front fences to fill water bottles unless you like being sworn at by country people.

Horses are indeed awesome. He loved a good upper lip tickle, but who doesn’t?

We found some water at the Gladysdale tennis courts and headed back to Black Sands rd. Black sands is a well maintained gravel rd that winds its way upward through the forest just below Warburton. The climbing starts immediately, and is steady for 7.5k’s. It averages 6.6%, but we decided that as it is on dirt it deserves another 2%. I know I sure found it a tough slog as the unrelenting nature of the climb made it hard to get your breath. Really, there is only one small flat of a few hundred metres halfway up and that’s it. I did get to enjoy some pretty awesome scenery though, the mix of huge green ferns and tall Mountain Ash made the journey quite bearable. It also allowed me to stop and ‘take photos’.

The beginning of Black Sands rd. It was actually a great surface to ride on, very manageable on 23c’s

There were some great hairpins toward the top.

waiting at the top, Gareth found this guy trying to climb up his rim. This is definitive proof that leeches love campy.

After the main climb the road meanders along the ridge line and eventually, at the roads highest point, you are rewarded with a waterfall. We decided to risk it and filled our bottles again. No-one got sick so I guess it was ok. As the ride turns northward and heads toward Warburton we headed through some logging areas, which is always kind of a downer to come across after riding through so much untouched wilderness.

At the waterfall Scott and Gareth decided to stage an impromptu Rapha model shoot.

I was just thirsty. According to Shark Expert*, The Australian Army takes red cordial on its missions to add to water to make it safe for drinking. Something to do with the sugar apparently (Please note: Fact may not be an actual fact.)

The descent. God, the descent. Scott thought the earlier one was bad, but Gareth and I disagreed. This downhill section was truly dangerous, littered with debris, deep ruts cut into it from running water and large exposed rocks. Or pot holes. And it got bloody steep. I ended up getting a flat on the rear and was in the process of changing it when Scott noticed that my from tire had not one but two cuts in the sidewall with inner tube poking cheekily out the side. Great. Luckily it was at this moment that a genuine stand up gentleman, Bruce (name has been altered due to the fact I forgot) arrived on the scene in a Patrol. I seized my opportunity and bought a lift down to Warburton. I won’t bore you with the details of my awesome adventures there, but suffice to say Scott saved the day and we ate doughnuts in the end to make up for it.

The boys put on their leg warmers for the descent. I just enjoyed the scenery. If you can think of a better way to make paper, I don’t want to know about it.

This was one of the better sections of the descent. Otherwise known as Warburton Pave.

Doughnuts fix everything.

This is definitely a ride recommended. There are a few other options through the northern end that may make the descent less hair-raising, but either way it can still be done safely if you take it easy. But I just got 25c tires the other day, so maybe this way out isn’t such a bad idea…

Until next time. Pinchy

*When Scott dispenses his pearls of wisdom, he is known as Shark Expert.

This ride came out of nowhere and wasn’t very well planned.  Scott had work on, but Pinch, Gareth and myself were good to go.  Our initial plan was to to leave Craigieburn at 07:00 am, ride up Mount Macedon, cup of tea & biscuits at Woodend and back to Craigieburn by 3:00 pm.  Leaving us time to wine & dine our mistresses and head over to a birthday party in the city later on in the night.

We did not leave the carpark until 10:00 am.  I literally rode 2 metres, hit a gutter and gave myself a pinch flat.  Motherfucker!  The way we were going, it seemed unlikely we were ever going to leave the carpark at all.

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You don’t often hear of people harp on about riding around the Hume region and we now know why. The place is a massive shit hole. It’s when we get to the Shire of Macedon Ranges that things get picturesque and the rides with people you don’t really like become more tolerable.

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Just before we hit Mt. Macedon,  I got another flat (a slow leak on my front tyre this time).  I was able to ride on it, but it meant I had to pump it up every fifteen kilometres.  Being such a lazy prick and thinking that it was a good idea (and more manly) to ride up Mt. Macedon with a flat tyre, we decided to press on and not change it until we got to Woodend.  Bad Idea.

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By the first incline, Gareth had already left us.  Pinch and I were left to battle it out for the bridesmaid position.

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The air was fresher than Will Smith, the views were amazing, native animals were out frolicking and all I could think about was my front flat tyre.  Macedon nearly made me weep like a corporate baby boomer from one of those shit Rapha videos, but Pinch and I persisted so we could see Gareth gloating at the top of the hill.

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A few minutes rest up the top, a ten kilometre downhill ride down to Woodend, a short lunch, a change of tyre and a quick slog back to Craigieburn averaging between 35-40 km/hr and we were back home just before the sun set.  Thanks Mt. Mazza for an awesome day!

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Oh, and we still got to dinner!

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And.. we managed to get to the party as well.  Happy birthday mad cans Nikailah!!!!

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